Gabriela presents on Stereotype Threat in Game Culture at the Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research

Gabriela and fellow presenters at the Sixth Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research at Columbia University.

Gabriela and fellow presenters at the Sixth Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research at Columbia University.

The Sixth Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research occurred on January 25, 2013.  In its annual tradition, the Subway summit is a research presentation conference where scholars from several New York and New Jersey-area Universities come together to discuss their emerging work in the areas of cognition, learning and technology.  The conference was held at Teachers College, Columbia University, and researchers from Fordham, New York University, Columbia University, Rutgers University and the City University of New York’s Graduate Center presented their work.

Gabriela Richard’s presentation, “Gender bias and stereotype threat vulnerability in game culture, and its implications for equitable educational game design,” discussed emerging findings that show that designed social realities around race and gender in games and game culture can have measurable disproportionate effects on players, particularly females and ethnic minorities, and that those effects can have real implications for learning.  Her findings specifically showed that females and ethnic minorities were more vulnerable to bias, which can manifest itself through harassment received by other players, or through designed social realities in games. She further discussed her findings related to stereotype threat and why being cognizant of the social realities we design in our educational games will be important for equitable and inclusive learning experiences with our games.