AJ introduces the Journal of Emerging Learning Design / ELD13 Conference

Emerging Learning Design is pleased to announce the new Journal of Emerging Learning Design (ELDJ).

This journal is an outgrowth of the annual Emerging Learning Design Conference, which makes its home at Montclair State University (MSU). The journal will present best practices in technology design and implementation by offering articles that propose or review how technology can further enhance the pedagogy of engaging and dynamic approaches to learning.

Visti http://eldj.montclair.edu to find the inaugural issue of this journal with the ensuing issue being made up of proceedings from the ELD Conference this year on June 7, 2013.

The journal’s editor-in-chief is Cigdem Penbeci Talgar, Acting Director of the Research Academy for University Learning and the managing editor is AJ Kelton, Director of Emerging & Instructional Technology for the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, both at MSU.

Registration for the Emerging Learning Design 2013 Conference is currently open and can be found at http://eld.montclair.edu/registration/  So feel free to share this email with your friends and colleagues.

The conference schedule can be found at http://eld.montclair.edu/schedule/

We are very much looking forward to the keynote presentation by our special guest, Dr. Christopher Hoadley from New York University

The Death Of Content: Why Universities and Schools are (and aren’t) being replaced by the Internet

In this talk, I argue that the current coin of the realm in academia–content–is dying and that universities need to radically rethink their role in the world. MOOCs, homeschooling, and the shadow education system all are evidence that the 20th century role of schools is decreasingly relevant. But does this mean that schools will become obsolete? I argue that schools face a choice: use technology to enhance their current functions but hasten their demise, or use technology to transform themselves and capitalize on 17th century strengths to be a cornerstone of the 21st century knowledge economy. I offer some ideas on how to reconceptualize the notion of ‘schools’ based on the latest research inlearning and on ancient ideas about how to teach.

Dr. Chris Hoadley is associate professor in the Educational Communication and Technology Program and the Program in Digital Media Designfor Learning. He has over 35 years of experience in designing, building, and studying ways for computers to enhance collaboration andlearning. Currently his research focuses on collaborative technologies and computer support for cooperative learning (CSCL). Hoadley is the director of dolcelab, the Laboratory for Design Of Learning, Collaboration & Experience. He is an affiliate scholar for the National Academy of Engineering’s Center for the Advancement of Scholarship in Engineering Education (CASEE) and was awarded a Fulbright for 2008-2009 in the South Asia Regional program to study educational technologies for sustainability and empowerment in rural Himalayan villages. Other interests include research on and through design, systems for supporting social capital and distributed intelligence, the role of informatics and digital libraries in education, and science and engineering education. Hoadley previously chaired the American Educational Research Association’s Special Interest Group for Education in Science and Technology (now SIG: Learning Sciences), and served as the first president of the International Society for the Learning Sciences. Hoadley earned his baccalaureate in cognitive science from MIT, and a masters in computer science and doctorate in education from UC Berkeley. He previously taught at Stanford University, Mills College, and Penn State University in education, computer science, and information sciences.

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